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Diabetes: A Family Matter

Diabetes: A Family Matter - About Us

Dedication

Kimberly Malone - Living with Diabetes

The Diabetes: A Family Matter program and toolkit is dedicated to Kimberly Malone. My daughter and family has been the inspiration for my concerns about diabetes. Kimberly has type 1 diabetes and our family has been living with this disease since she was 11 years old, more than 32 years ago at this point in time. It is through my life experience with her that I first became concerned about diabetes. Over time, our family has experienced the many lessons that diabetes can teach you. As we have experienced the challenges presented by this disease, we have marveled at Kimberly’s strength and the wisdom she has brought as we have seen her struggle and overcome so many challenges.

Click here to see Kimberly's Photo-Story

Purpose and Mission

The purpose of this program is to provide people in local communities located in the Appalachian region with materials and ideas about ways to promote healthy lifestyles and prevent diabetes. The program and toolkit focus on diabetes prevention and care management from a family and community viewpoint. Knowledge about local traditions, usual ways of life, and diabetes management has been used to develop ideas that are included.

While all forms of diabetes are of concern, this toolkit mainly focuses on type 2 diabetes. The toolkit provides ways to increase healthy lifestyles and prevent or stop the spread of diabetes and other chronic illnesses. It suggests ways to manage the disease and delay or prevent serious complications. Diabetes educators or other health professionals can use the toolkit to enlist local volunteers and help community individuals and families. As the toolkit materials and activities are reviewed, ideas about the best ways to use them locally can be decided.

These materials are primarily intended for use in rural places of Appalachia. A review of printed and online diabetes education materials has shown that the focus is most often targeted at more suburban or urban persons. Materials that address rural people and include strong ideas about family are often not available. While this toolkit is meant for use with rural Appalachian people, it may still be of use in other regions that share similar cultural patterns. The toolkit may also be of use in suburban or urban centers that serve people that are from Appalachia.

Contact Information

Photo of Sharon A. DenhamIf you are interested in getting specific information about this website or program and want to get in touch with the site developer, or if you want information pertaining to research, Appalachia, or family-focused care, please contact Sharon A. Denham, DSN, RN at denham@ohio.edu.

Click here to see Sharon Denham's complete curriculum vitae

If you would like to provide information about your program for including in this website or are interested in something pertaining to the social network site, then please contact sugarhelper@gmail.com.

If you are interested in contacting others that have contributed to this site, please see below:

Margaret Manoogian, PhD
Photo of Margaret ManoogianContact email:
mmmanoogian@gmail.com
Ann Rathbun, PhD
Photo of Ann RathbunContact email:
a.rathbun@morehead.edu
Larry Hamel-Lambert
Photo of Ann RathbunContact email:
hamel-la@ohio.edu
Steve Fetsch, MA
Photo of Steve FetschMay 22, 2012
Steve was a freelance video editor and web designer. He directed and/or co-produced award-winning documentaries, including "A Forest Returns," "Soul of the Woods," and "Ropewalk, A Cordage Engineer's Journey Through History," and "Living with Diabetes in Appalachia." He was a founding board member and artistic mentor for the Ohio Valley Museum of Discovery and involved in numerous productions in theatrical, entertainment and web-based venues in Athens and elsewhere. Steve's wide-ranging creative energy in digital and material art, and his monumental kindness and generosity toward family, friends and mere passersby, from the elderly to the very young, are treasured memories for the many who will miss his vibrant life force in our community. Steve died at 42 years of age on May 22, 2012.
Amelia Krales, MA
Print Designer
Contact email:
AmeliaHolowatyKrales.Blogspot.com
Mark Riley, M.Ed.
Photo of Mark RileyWebsite Administrator
Contact email:
rileym1@ohio.edu